Ramsey County History podcast (general)

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Syndication

No one knows more about subterranean St. Paul -- the caves beneath our feet -- than geologist and author Greg Brick. In his new book, Minnesota Caves: History and Lore, Brick describes the many caves, both natural and human-made, under St. Paul -- their legends, their lore, and their reality.

Direct download: Ramsey20County20History20Podcast20010.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:48pm CDT

The Gibbs Farm museum preserves remnants of both native and pioneer life from the mid-19th century, right in the middle of a densely populated urban environment. There you can find farm buildings from the Gibbs family, an archeological site, re-creations of a sod hut, native tipi and long house, native prairie and an early orchard, and a one-room school house.

Category:general -- posted at: 9:24pm CDT

The Euro-American phase of Minnesota history begins with Fort Snelling, starting in 1820. The fort's busiest period was 1861-1865 -- the Civil War and the Dakota Conflict. All of the soldiers headed south to fight for the Union, and west to fight the Dakota, passed through the fort. And over a thousand displaced Dakota were interned there too. Steve Osman's new book, Fort Snelling and the Civil War -- published by the Ramsey County Historical Society -- is full of stories you've never heard before. 

Direct download: Ramsey20County20History20Podcast20008.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:46pm CDT

For almost a century the Ford Motor Company built vehicles in St. Paul, first on University Avenue, and from 1925 onward in Highland Park. Architect and historian Brian McMahon has now published a book telling the story of Ford in St. Paul, The Ford Century. And for the Fall 2016 issue of Ramsey County History magazine McMahon has written an article about the Highland Park factory's defense production during World War II. We talked with Brian McMahon about both themes.

Direct download: Ramsey20County20History20Podcast20007.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:57pm CDT

Harriet Bishop is the only well-known woman among St. Paul's early settlers. In fact, she may be the best-known of all. She was Minnesota's first schoolteacher, yes, but what else do we know about her? Minnesota's leading historian, Professor Mary Wingerd, brings us closer to the real Harriet Bishop -- writer, land speculator, jilted bride, divorcee -- a person far more interesting than our image of her as virtuous schoolmarm.

Direct download: Ramsey_County_History_Podcast_006.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 1:49pm CDT

He was sometimes known as "mayor for life." George Latimer served as mayor of St. Paul from 1976 to 1990, the longest consecutive term in St. Paul history. A lot happened ob his watch: the Town Square and Lowertown developments, the Dutch elm plague; the departure of big employers like Whirlpool and Amhoist; a population decline of 40,000, and plenty more. Throughout it all Mr. Latimer remained very popular; he is still popular today. In this interview you will hear some of the reason why: there is lots of laughter.

Direct download: Ramsey_County_History_Podcast_005.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 1:07pm CDT

For more than a century pioneer legislator Joe Rolette has been credit for preventing the Minnesota state capital from being moved from St. Paul to St. Peter. The story has been repeated countless times. But, Is it true?

In this episode Minnesota historian William Lass makes the case that the popular story is folklore, not history.  

Direct download: Ramsey20County20History20Podcast20004.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:06am CDT

What can an anti-Nazi writer and intellectual, exiled in the United States, do for his beloved Germany? Over 70 years ago Prince Hubertus zu Lowenstein visited St. Paul and met Hamline University student John Larson. A lifelong friendship and flood of letters ensued. John Larson has now assembled some of these letters, from World War II and after, into a book entitled The German Friend. We interviewed Mr. Larson at his home on Taylors Falls.

The Minnesota Historical Society has created a new venture called MNopedia: short-form articles of state history -- including several Ramsey County stories -- in an on-line encyclopedia. We interviewed MNopedia's then-editor, Molly Huber.

Direct download: Ramsey_County_History_Podcast_003.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:50pm CDT

Edward Phelan was one of St. Paul's very first settlers. Was he also a murderer? In September 1839 the body of Phelan's cabin-mate, John Hays, was found floating in the Mississippi River. He had been beaten to death. Phelan was charged with the crime, but not convicted. Now, 170 years later, St. Paul author Gary Brueggemann believes he has solved the case. He tells the tale in his new book, Minnesota's Oldest Murder Mystery. We met with Gary Brueggemann at Landmark Center in downtown St. Paul.

 

Swede Hollow is a ravine on St. Paul's east side, and for a hundred years -- 1850s to 1950s -- a receptor neighborhood for recent immigrants. Swedes first, then Italians, then Mexican-Americans. St. Paul historian Steve Trimble edited the Swede Hollow memoirs of Michael Sanchelli for the Spring 2014 issue of Ramsey County History magazine. Steve Trimble joined us to talk about life in old Swede Hollow. 

Direct download: Ramsey_County_History_Podcast_002.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 3:17pm CDT

John Milton tells the story of how citizen opposition delayed for many years to completion of Interstate Highway 35 through St. Paul. And labor historian Peter Rachleff describes how he and his partner Beth Cleary plan to convert the closed Arlington Hills public library into the East Side Freedom Library in St. Paul.

Direct download: Ramsey_County_HIstory_Podcast_001.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:35pm CDT

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